Why Are You So Different?

Carol A. Hand

Years ago, I accepted a position at a university as an assistant professor. I did not know at the time that I was only the second Native American faculty member the department of social work had ever hired for a tenure track position. The first left 30 years before I came because of the anti-Native discrimination she experienced, a perception that the state district court affirmed in a decision that awarded damages. The anti-Native bias was still palpable and unrelenting during the 3 years I spent there. Unlike my predecessor, I chose not to pursue legal action. Doing so would have locked me in an angry, ugly battle for years. Instead, I turned to writing, grateful that I could escape from a toxic environment with such unhappy people. The following essay is drawn from the series of stories I wrote about my experiences and reflections during those years.

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“Why are you so different?,” my colleague asked. I suspect that, in part, my response to this question contributed to being ostracized and pathologized by faculty who were unable to hear the many ways this question could be asked and the many possible, legitimate, responses.

As I read this neutral question on a written page, there are so many possible meanings. There are so many ways tone of voice, spoken inflections, facial expression, and body language suggest intent. Meaning or intent is also nested within context. The individual histories of the person who asks and the person who is asked frame the meaning, the way the question is interpreted. The history of relationship between the asker and responder matters, as do differences in history and degree of belonging within the system where the question was asked. Power differentials, both in terms of hierarchical status and long-term relationships with the system, matter as well. And equally important is the congruence between how the question is asked and the publicly stated mission of the agency in which it is asked.

As a child, I asked this question many times. As I pondered the amazing diversity of the six-pointed shapes of snowflakes that fell on my dark mittens on a winter day, I asked, “Why are you so different?,” with a sense of wonder and awe. As a child who grew up between two cultures yet not fitting neatly in either, I asked myself, “Why are you so different?,” with a sense of genuine puzzlement. Embracing that sense of difference actually led me to engage in authentic efforts to learn to understand the world from as many diverse perspectives as possible. My favorite children’s story was about the Churkendoose, a little bird that was a mixture of a chicken, turkey, duck, and goose (Berengerg, 1946). “Difference” in this story was simply that – difference. Ultimately, there were no values assigned to being one creature or another, and no interpretations of being superior or inferior as a result of difference.

thechurkendoose

As a teenager, the question was more emotion-laden. I wondered why I could not simply be a part of the cliques that reached out to include me, but not others whose difference was more visible and seen as inferior. (Those who were excluded were the most interesting to me.) Difference that meant inclusion or exclusion was based on family socioeconomics, religion, appearance, perceived intelligence (either too much or too little), or being “cool,” whatever that meant. I respected peers who did not seem to care about their exclusion. Instead of joining cliques, I reached out to those who were excluded, not in an attempt to forge an anti-clique, but to understand the position of difference as a somewhat consciously chosen stance of resistance. I admired the courage of those who were willing to carry the responsibility of thinking critically, who were willing to challenge norms and social expectations in visible, creative ways.

As a young person searching for a place to belong, for a role and career that had meaning, difference had new connotations. It was time to believe in the message of the Churkendoose, a time to explore as wide a range of diversity as possible. I spent time in the hills of Appalachia and on Indian reservations, and worked in the inner city of Chicago while I attended an exclusive Catholic women’s college. I survived the streets of Hollywood, and experienced the possibilities and disappointments by being part of a New Age commune. Among my friends, I have counted priests and prostitutes, artists and legislators, people who were poor and rich, blue collar workers and university professors. Difference enriches my life and my understanding of the world. Like the snowflakes on my mitten as a child, it is a source of never-ending wonder and engenders curiosity.

I did not hear this sense of wonder and curiosity in my colleague’s question. It was intoned in a way that sounded more like an indictment. For more than a year, the indictment remained her preferred way of relating to me. It is at least honest to ask, accusatory or not, “Why are you so different?” “Perhaps,” I wondered, “is there a possibility of building deeper understandings across our differing perspectives?” Unfortunately, it was not possible with this colleague or others in positions of power at this particular university.

I was reminded of a passage from Hyemeyohsts Storm’s work, Seven Arrows (1972). If we place people in a circle, facing inward toward a multifaceted object in the center, each will see only one side, and each view will be incomplete. If each person can share their perspective with others in the circle, a fuller picture will be possible for all. Afraid of difference, we will see only what falls within our limited gaze. How can we teach this partial frame as the one truth? Why would one want to insist that this is the only true reality? And why would anyone be willing to believe such a ridiculous assertion? Difference is the rule, not the exception, and a wondrous gift promising the possibility of wider, deeper vision and understanding. The alternative is to live trapped in a small prison, much like the hell Sartre (1976) describes in Huis Clos (No Exit), surrounded only by people with whom we feel no affinity, consigned to a life that has little possibility for exploring the wonder that surrounds us every day.

snowflakes

Photo Credit: Google images – snowflakes

 

Copyright Notice: © Carol A. Hand and carolahand, 2013-2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carol A. Hand and carolahand with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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About Carol A. Hand

What matters are not the titles I’ve held or university degrees I earned or the size of a house or bank account. It’s really what I’ve learned from ordinary people like me whom I’ve met along the way. They taught me to live with gratitude and give thanks for each new day.
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15 Responses to Why Are You So Different?

  1. Carol Hand says:

    Reblogged this on intersistere.

    Like

  2. nicciattfield says:

    Such a lovely analysis of the ways of viewing difference! You were way ahead of your time, I think, but we are lucky because you share your wisdom.

    Like

    • Carol Hand says:

      Thank you, Nicci. I am grateful for your thoughtful comments. I feel the same way when I read your blog — I am deeply touched by your kindness and wisdom!

      Like

  3. Carol, In your list of experiences a few were similar to mine – “surviving the streets of Hollywood” particularly struck me. Are you contemplating writing a book of your life? You really should consider it – it sounds so interesting. And in my book “different” always ruled! 🙂

    Like

  4. Carol Hand says:

    Skywalker Storyteller, I am not surprised to hear that we share experiences in common, I sense that in your writing and poetry. In terms of writing a book about my life, I honestly don’t think I will ever will, although my life experiences do inspire many of the essays I post.

    I do agree with you whole-heartedly that difference is the rule rather than the exception!

    Like

  5. Jeff Nguyen says:

    Dr. Seuss, “Why fit in when you were born to stand out?”

    Like

  6. MF says:

    Thanks for sharing! I loved this piece!!

    It’s a key topic that needs to be discussed everywhere, really.

    We need to include this in our little shared project! 🙂

    “Different” is so big but it can also be just that, as you say, and a treasure! We are all different, and different in different aspects and levels, but then — I have also found (core of my self), like you, that I needed, sought for all kinds of people, as if life just with what I knew could not be enough. That’s why we’re social animals, I presume! Our societies, patriarchal (perhaps other systems would do this, but I just know this one!), are really good at distorting things and twisting them, to get us to see “different” as threatening… Because the values in these societies are about Force and Forcing all the time.

    Fortunately, when you value innocence and collaboration, the clear gaze, then you get to feel a kind of rebeliousness to limits that are continuously imposed in society, because you realize the great value of “different” — for your own life at least!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Pingback: Why are you so different? | Plans & What We Did In Class

  8. hipmonkey says:

    I’m different, just like everyone else…

    Like

  9. Pingback: “All Mixed Up”: The Lesson of the Churkendoose | THE MIX, a weekly look at mixed ancestry

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