Reflections on Aging

Carol A. Hand

As I look back on my life
I can humbly say
I love the little child I was
I’m grateful to her today

me 4

Photo: Bearing Battle Scars – 1952

Though I still bear the scars of battles
In my later years
I became a gentle warrior
By overcoming fears

While others may only see my greying hair
A loving heart’s within
Each day’s a chance to express love
As other lives begin

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Photo: My Granddaughter and Me – June 2015

 Copyright Notice: © Carol A. Hand and carolahand, 2013-2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carol A. Hand and carolahand with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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About Carol A. Hand

What matters are not the titles I’ve held or university degrees I earned or the size of a house or bank account. It’s really what I’ve learned from ordinary people like me whom I’ve met along the way. They taught me to live with gratitude and give thanks for each new day.
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30 Responses to Reflections on Aging

  1. I see gray hair. Dignity. A warm heart and strong character.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Rajagopal says:

    Your liking the child you once were, in retrospect, is a sure sign of having grown healthily, embracing right values, to successfully arrive at your present stage in life, Carol. Truly, child here is, to slightly modify Wordsworth, the mother of the woman, as beautifully reflected in your sweet little poem…best wishes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for your thoughtful comments, Raj. For some reason, I saw this picture of me as a child in my thoughts this morning and felt a deep sense of compassion. Your reminder of Wordsworth is appropriate. As a child, my role was to protect my mother from abuse – in a sense, to be her mother and my own.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the point in aging where we transition into the role of mentor and begin to create a legacy of love that will benefit future generations. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. mandy says:

    “I love the little child I was…” is such a beautiful statement, Carol. I can picture the wonderful, warrior girl-child you were; it explains the amazing, gentle warrior adult you are today. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Jim Brennan says:

    I’m glad you shared this, Carol. It is so genuine, so honest. The photo says it all. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Tiny says:

    Beautiful reflective poem! And wonderful pictures!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. hsampson says:

    Just beautiful Carol! I have no words! Thank you!!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Robbie says:

    Oh -Carol, I needed to hear that today! This year, my oldest daughter had twins in Stockholm and now we have 4 under the age of 3:-) I have been thinking a lot lately about my life….what I have done, where I have been….why I am here…where I am going….
    My parents are aging rapidly and I remember my mother telling me-when we die you are the older ones….I am fearful of how I can be useful as I age….I am afraid for my parents for their bodies are betraying them + I can see where mine will in the future..all these changes and when you are young we spend too much time worrying…..now I live in the moment they are precious:-) I am closing in on 60 and can see it from the shoreline + I can’t imagine living to 80..

    “While others may only see my greying hair
    A loving heart’s within
    Each day’s a chance to express love
    As other lives begin”

    You are such a wise woman:-) I needed your poem today:-) It gives me purpose…..
    I have one grandson ( 2 yrs) that lives in our town and he is spending the night today + your poem and photos really helped me see what is important in life!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Robbie, thank you for sharing such lovely and important insights about “coming of age.” Four grandchildren – how wonderful! I’m glad you are able to have your grandson with you. These early precious years go by so fast. I remember my grandson as a 6 pound baby. Now, at 16, he towers above me.

      The years I spent working with elders helped prepare me a little. Yet I’m still surprised to see my mother looking back at me from the mirror. I do have a funny poem I’ll share some day, but as the thunder rumbles, I know I need to sign off soon. I promise to reply to your other comments tomorrow. In the meantime, enjoy your time with your grandson ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Robbie says:

        I am enjoying it and I survived his weekend stay. First one for he usually stays for only a day:-) I am having a blast! I wish the others were close by but I am thankful he is nearby:-) You are blessed to have such beautiful grandchildren:-)

        Liked by 1 person

        • Grandchildren are a delight, aren’t they. I always suffer withdrawal when they go home, but I also need the peace and quiet to rebalance.

          And speaking of aging, here’s the poem I promised to share:

          This Will Shock You!
          (Anonymous)

          This will shock you!
          I’m never lonely here – for I have four men in my life.
          Don’t tell!
          I get up in the morning with Charlie Horse.
          I spend all day with Arthur Itis.
          I dine with Will Power.
          I go to bed every night with Ben Gay.

          Everything is farther away now than it used to be.
          It is twice as far to the corner, and they have added a hill I’ve noticed.
          I have given up running for the bus; it leaves faster than it used to.
          And it seems to me that they are making stairs steeper than in the old days.
          Have you noticed the smaller print they are using in the newspapers now?
          And there is no sense asking people to read aloud.
          Everyone speaks in such a low voice I can hardly hear them.

          It is almost impossible to reach my shoelaces.
          Even people are changing.
          They are much younger than they used to be when I was their age.
          On the other hand, people my age are so much older than I am.
          I ran into a classmate the other day, and she had aged so much I didn’t even recognize her.

          I got to thinking about the poor thing while I was combing my hair this morning
          And in so doing I glanced at my reflection in the mirror.
          You know, they don’t even make mirrors like they used to.

          Liked by 1 person

  9. Robbie says:

    LOVE IT!!!! everything is so true but this one hit home lately-gosh, they sure do!
    “On the other hand, people my age are so much older than I am.
    I ran into a classmate the other day, and she had aged so much I didn’t even recognize her”
    +
    You know mirrors do not work anymore-who is that woman staring back at me-lol. I was telling a friend the other day- ” I feel the same inside and feel great some days until I see a reflection in a mirror or a picture someone has taken—who is that lady?LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Bernadette says:

    Remembering and loving that little girl that dwells within us is so important isn’t it? I can imagine that you were very much the warrior as a young girl because you have grown into a fierce warrior woman. You have a lot to bequeath to that beautiful little girl you have your arm around.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. lbeth1950 says:

    I love being older.

    Liked by 1 person

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