Times of Transition

Carol A. Hand

When you’re born in-between classes and cultures
Transitions are an everyday given
Deposited by warps in place and time
Sometimes serendipitous, sometimes seemingly self-driven

Do we choose our path in life
Before our first breaths with vision clear
Knowing who we are at first then forgetting
As we accommodate to each new “here”

These billions of cells that comprise who we are
We see them bound together in a semi-permeable skin
Separate from others and all that surrounds us
As our travels in this material dimension begin

Letting go of certainty – the things we think we know
Floating free to unknown places during times of transition
Realizing that like the earth’s separate continents
We are all joined as one beneath the sea of illusory division

earth and sea

Photo: Earth from Space – Free Images 

 

Copyright Notice: © Carol A. Hand and carolahand, 2013-2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carol A. Hand and carolahand with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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About Carol A. Hand

What matters are not the titles I’ve held or university degrees I earned or the size of a house or bank account. It’s really what I’ve learned from ordinary people like me whom I’ve met along the way. They taught me to live with gratitude and give thanks for each new day.
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31 Responses to Times of Transition

  1. cakmn says:

    Most excellent, Carol, and this applies to all of us.

    We may not all see ourselves as born in-between classes and cultures, yet we are born in-between Source and matter. Born in-between the Great Realm of Potential and the world of individuation wherein we maintain ties, invisible and tenuous thought they may seem, between the Source of Life and that which appears dead, between that which is Unified and all that appears divided and separated, yet we cling to one while we ignore or even deny the other.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Norman Pilon says:

    I agree. We are more alike than different, though we are both alike and different, and if we were to hang out together for any length of time, living in similar circumstances, dealing with the same concrete individuals, we’d start to look like one another in what we say and what we do, what we’d sing about and hope for, what we would wear and how we would eat something , and others from far away places might look at us, at what is really merely only local color, and speak of us as belonging to a different culture, and we would say and think the same about them.

    Difference isn’t essential, as in a kind of Aristotelian essence. It is nothing but mere contingency inscribed in life sustaining habit, what we call ‘a way of life.’ We are different. No one is the same. Not even those who share ‘a way of life.’ Because we are all mere contingency and concrete instances of this thing we call a human being who cannot but exist in a concrete and particular circumstance and thus be a concrete individual who may or may not closely resemble others.

    But we are all the same, also, because the world impinges on each of us in similarly discernible ways and leaves on all similar discernible marks. And if we hang out long enough, in spite of ourselves, we begin to act and think and love and talk in all of the same accents, which proves that we are the same or could become alike, that we “. . . are all joined as one beneath the sea of illusory division.”

    Liked by 4 people

    • cakmn says:

      I think it’s important to realize that unity does not necessitate or require uniformity. Although we all originate from the same Source, and because of this, we all share That in common, meaning the deepest essence of our Life and our being, we are also endowed with different potentials which can manifest as different possibilities, and this results in the diversity that enriches our lives, provided we embrace our diversity. So, we are the same only in our deepest essence while also being different on the surface, with some being more different than others.

      Many individuals do seek and strive, whether consciously or unconsciously, for group unity through some adopted manifestations of uniformity in order to distinguish themselves from those outside of the group, but the uniformity adopted to establish group identity is artificial ans superficial, and often times imposed, and it therefore represent a fragile symbol of unity that is not real and does not endure.

      Liked by 4 people

      • I agree with your observations, Carl. Sharing deeper connections isn’t the same as uniformity, and superficial group identities can often be divisive, blinding us to a deeper awareness of connection to all that is.

        Liked by 1 person

        • cakmn says:

          Thank you, Carol.

          After I posted that comment, I’ve continued to contemplate as I’ve gone about doing other things, and I’ve up with some imagery to share regarding unity, uniformity and diversity.

          Imagine a tree. Any tree of any type and size. Visualize the trunk as a solid support, transfer and communication system. Visualize within that trunk the different layers and types of cells, the different functions of these cells, the different degrees of aliveness. Also visualize the root system: how it, too, is made up of different types of cells that perform different functions, and how it penetrates and radiates far from the base of the trunk and through the earth. Then visualize the branches reaching upwards and spreading: again composed of different types of cells with different functions. From the branches, there arise petioles and the leaves they attach to the branches, leaves which perform the ‘magic’ of respiration, moisture regulation and food production, along with shade and color.

          There is great diversity of design, substance and function incorporated into this tree. There is uniformity of substance and structure within certain parts of the tree’s structure. And there is an all embracing unity in the harmonious functioning of these diverse elements that exist together in a cooperative wholeness that is this tree.

          Beyond this tree are many others, to perhaps create a whole forest which can also be viewed on different levels and appreciated for its many intertwined displays of unity, uniformity and diversity, including not only the one type of tree imagined, but also all of the other life forms and systems that together make this a forest.

          We can also view our selves in a similar manner, including as individuals composed of many parts and sub-parts, as groups from families to communities to nations to a world population, and as part of the biosphere of Earth. Where and how does diversity enrich us throughout these many levels? Where and how does uniformity best serve both us and also the whole? Where and how does unity best serve us and the whole?

          Liked by 1 person

        • Thank you for the depth and beauty of your thoughts and insights about the dimensions of diversity and unity, Carl. Your description of the tree as a multidimensional entity comprised of many different individual cells and systems work collaboratively to sustain each other and the entity as a whole is quite elegant. You have also raised crucial questions about what this means for ever-larger systems.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Your thoughtful and profound comments are always a gift, Norman. I’m grateful for the crucial insights you have shared about difference and social conformity.

      Like

  3. sojourner says:

    “Do we choose our path in life
    Before our first breaths with vision clear
    Knowing who we are at first then forgetting
    As we accommodate to each new “here””

    This really resonates deep inside.

    Maybe I did choose to be here. Maybe I did choose to be who I am. Maybe I have always known my purpose for being here all along. But because of the ways of the “here”, maybe I have simply forgotten.

    if so, can I, or will I, ever be capable of regaining my full memory?

    Liked by 3 people

    • Profound reflections and questions, Sojourner. And so essential to ponder. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

      Liked by 1 person

      • sojourner says:

        I know the post was about so much more, but this has been something that has been on mind recently. Maybe it’s just senility setting in;-)

        Liked by 1 person

        • Years ago, I was trying to make sense of literary theory and I pondered the meaning of a simple statement. “The reader is also part of the text.” Meaning is not something an author (or musician) can control. I’m grateful to hear that this simple poem unlocked crucial insights for you, and I’m also grateful that you felt you could share them here. Thank you, Sojourner 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        • sojourner says:

          “Meaning is not something an author (or musician) can control.”

          Absolutely! Nor do I ever want to control it in my music. How sterile that would make the art!

          Thank you, Carol. I knew you would understand!

          Liked by 1 person

        • cakmn says:

          “Meaning is not something an author (or musician) can control.”

          When an author or artist of any sort creates a final product, even if it is offered for sale and the creator is compensated for their creation, that product and the creativity behind it is also given as a gift. Whether or not it is given with any specific intention, there can never be any control over how it is received. Giving requires a letting go, a complete release. If it is given with any attachment, with any expectation, that giving will likely result in disappointment, because it represents a hope or effort to have control over something that cannot be controlled. Reception responses may range from those who give something in return that far exceeds expectations, to those who simply receive and leave, to those who ignore, reject or possibly even destroy what was created. Consider how all of this also applies to all that the Creator has created, yet the Creator continues to create all and everything through the Mystery of Life.

          Liked by 1 person

        • sojourner says:

          “When an author or artist of any sort creates a final product, even if it is offered for sale and the creator is compensated for their creation, that product and the creativity behind it is also given as a gift. Whether or not it is given with any specific intention, there can never be any control over how it is received. Giving requires a letting go, a complete release. If it is given with any attachment, with any expectation, that giving will likely result in disappointment, because it represents a hope or effort to have control over something that cannot be controlled…”

          Excellent! Could not agree more!

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Poignant and pertinent! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “Realizing that like the earth’s separate continents
    We are all joined as one beneath the sea of illusory division”
    ~ So true.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you for your comments, Rosaliene. The metaphor of continents and the ocean is something I read so long ago. I wish I could cite the author. I think it was Joel Goldsmith in his work, The Thunder of Silence. (I gave his works away to a state prison, along with many other books, when I purged my library before my last move, so I can’t be sure…)

      Like

  6. Wow and wow again, Carol. This is stunning and the last line just knocked my socks off! Hugs, 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  7. hsampson says:

    Beautiful!! Carol, thanks!!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. richholschuh says:

    Thank you for the affirmation, Carol. This illusion of separation is a most profound realization, only now beginning to be clarified within my mind, calming the spirit.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Elegant and reflective, Carol.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Swetha M says:

    Beautiful words that carry deep meaning! Thanks for sharing:)

    Liked by 1 person

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