Reflections about Roots and Resistance

Carol A. Hand

I want to thank Miriam for her though-provoking reflection about the need for resistance in these times. Her example of the Menominee Tribe’s successful resistance to the policy of tribal termination is inspiring. Her reflection sparked my memories about the Menominee Nation, referred to as  “The Forest Keepers,” and how carefully they have tended their forest. It’s one of the oldest sustainable-yield forests in the U.S.

With the advent of casinos and gaming resources, the Menominee Tribe invested in their infrastructure, expanding health and educational services. Many Tribal members, who had been forced to move away from their community because there were few jobs, returned. The tribe was faced with a conundrum. There wasn’t enough land or housing to accommodate the influx. Another community would probably have cut down the forest to create new housing developments. Instead, the Menominee Tribe used their resources to buy farmland around the reservation that had already been clear cut. Their wise stewardship is visible in satellite images like the one below.

According to Alan Caldwell, director of the Menominee Cultural Institute,

“the forest provides the Menominee people with a link to their storied past and to the old ways that have allowed them to endure through even the most difficult of times. It provides old medicines, silence, and hidden places to conduct ancient ceremonies.” (Ron Seely, Wisconsin State Journal, October 05, 2003)

Miriam’s reflections also inspired me to think critically about my own views about resistance from a different cultural perspective. Ojibwe history and people have taught me a lot about how to survive the challenges of changing times, reminding me again of the metaphor of trees. Knowing our roots becomes crucial for many reasons. Although unseen, roots provide nourishment and grounding. Making sure our roots are healthy helps us withstand storms.

 

These are some of the lessons I learned from studying and reflecting about my Ojibwe roots.

***

“Be moderate in all things; watch, listen, and consider, your deeds will be prudent.”
(Midewewin Code, the Ojibwe “Path of Life,” Basil Johnston, 1976, p. 93)

“When I was a boy, there were only about twenty-eight families that lived in the village here. All of the families were poor, but we hunted and shared what we gathered. Deer were divided among all of the families, and my friend and I snared rabbits as young boys and would share what we caught with everyone. [Laughing]

“I remember one time when I was a young boy, it was winter time, and all of us were really cold. We didn’t have any fire wood. So I had gone off to find some wood, and there was little to be seen. It was cold, and it was getting dark when I came up to a white farmer’s fenced in land. I thought ‘those fence posts would burn nicely.’ So, I cut them and brought them home. We had a fire that night. The farmer was really mad when he saw that his posts were gone and wanted to have the thief arrested.

“Ogema [the hereditary tribal leader] found out about it and figured out who had taken the posts. He came to wake me up early the next morning. It wasn’t even light out yet. He told me to get up and get dressed. We were going out to the woods to gather cedar trees. He showed me how to choose the right tress, cut them, and prepare the wood that is sacred to the Ojibwe people. And he taught me how to make posts.

“When we were finished, we brought the posts to the farmer and helped him repair the fence. I apologized for taking the posts. Ogema persuaded the farmer not to report me since I realized what I had done was wrong and worked hard to make up for my mistake. The farmer agreed. After that, Ogema knew how many families in the village were cold, so from then on he made sure that the community worked together so there was enough wood for everyone in the village.” (Ojibwe Elder, September 10, 2001)

This account of a life-changing formative experience for an Ojibwe boy illustrates the enduring legacy of a culture which valued children highly and had developed sophisticated techniques for ensuring their education and well-being (Broker, 1983; Johnston, 1982). Unlike most of the children of his generation, the boy in this account was able to remain with his family. Others his age were abducted as they walked along the village road by Bureau of Indian Affairs agents or missionaries and driven more than one hundred miles away to institutions euphemistically referred to as “Indian boarding schools” (Prucha, 1979; Johnston, 1989; Adams, 1995; Szasz, 1999; Child, 2000). Or, they were taken from their families by agents and sent off to live with Euro-American farm families to help with farm chores: they were sent to learn the skills of farmers, the value of private property ownership, and the morality of hard work. The lessons he learned from Ogema, from his family, and from his culture during his formative years during his childhood influenced his life and the life of his Ojibwe community profoundly.

The story reveals pivotal values: respect for other people and their lifeways, no matter how different, and the delicate arts of building cross-cultural relations and negotiating effectively with the larger world that surrounds the Ojibwe community. These lessons, grounded in Ojibwe values, have remained important throughout the lifetime of the elder who shared his story.

This account may not appear at first to be related to the topic of resistance to colonial oppression and Euro-American hegemony. However, differing cosmologies, and the values, ideologies, ethics, and behaviors which emanate from them are at the heart of ensuring the survival of tribal cultures.

Ojibwe children were embedded within everyday lives of the community. By watching adults, listening to stories told by elders, and participating in rites of passage and ceremonies, they learned to live according to the ethics of pimadaziwin (the good life) for the sake of higher ideals and the survival of the people (Hallowell, 1967; Kohl, 1985).
The central core of pimadaziwin was the “doctrine of original sanctity” (Ross, 1992, p. 165). Children were viewed as sacred gifts bestowed on parents and the community as a whole by the Creator. All people were seen as good. Each had their own connection to the Creator and their own specific path to follow to assure not only their own well-being but to ensure the survival of their community and the Ojibwe people overall. There are a number of ethical principles for achieving and maintaining pimadaziwin: (1) the ethic of non-interference; (2) the ethic of conservation; (3) the ethic of expecting excellence; and (4) the ethic of acting when the time is right (Ross, 1992).

The ethic of non-interference means that it was considered an ethical breach for Ojibwe people to correct, criticize, control, or coerce others, including children (Ross, 1992; Densmore, 1979). Physical discipline as a means of socializing children was very rare (Densmore, 1979; Hilger, 1992). Teaching children knowledge, skills, and appropriate behavior was done primarily through stories and example. Humor was sometimes used to curb troubling behaviors, and in cases involving serious risks, scaring stories were sometimes used (e.g., “the owl is going to get you if you don’t stop”). As the opening story illustrates, Ogema offered the youth an alternative set of actions which helped him make restitution for his behavior and heal relationships. It also protected him from police intervention. The youth was not coerced to go with Ogema even though his transgression – stealing someone else’s property – was contrary to pimadaziwin, Ogema didn’t shame or criticize him. Instead, he was taught a new skill, developed self-confidence, gained respect for others, and clearly began to understand the connection between his actions and the welfare of the community as a while. Six decades after the incident, the lessons of Ojibwe “morality” remain important to the elder.

The ethic of conservation makes it inappropriate to show anger of sorrow, or to talk about such feelings in an open or confrontational manner (Ross, 1992; Hallowell, 1967). This was a highly evolved mechanism for building and preserving congenial relationships in small, closely-knit communities. The ethic encouraged withdrawal from conflict and mediated against angry, violent outbursts. Careful deliberation and balance in all actions, even war, were regarded highly by the Ojibwe (Hallowell, 1967). Again, Ogema’s strategy was carefully crafted. Ogema was able to present an alternative to an errant youth in a way that made the youth feel it was his own choice. Ogema didn’t yell at the youth or tell him he was wrong. And he didn’t tell the youth that all “white farmers” were invaders whose property should be confiscated whenever possible. Nor did Ogema yell at the farmer or show his fear of police involvement and all that might mean for the youth.

The ethic of expecting excellence, a requirement for survival in a challenging environment, made the oral expression of praise or gratitude superfluous and inappropriate: excellence is what one is expected to achieve. One’s survival and the survival of the Ojibwe people depend on it (Ross, 1992). Affection and approval flowed, rather, from every day interaction (Densmore, 1979). Ogema showed his concern and affection by seeking the youth out and caring enough to work with him to restore balanced relationships. Ogema chose cedar for the new posts, a wood that had proven resistant to decay in the wetland home of the Ojibwe. He taught the youth how to work with cedar, but didn’t praise the youth for his cooperation, hard work, or skill. Ogema did work alongside the youth until the job was completed and the conflict resolved, a clear indication of his positive regard and commitment.

The ethic of acting when the time is right requires keen observational skills and complex reasoning which considers actions from the perspective of larger social, environmental, and temporal contexts (Ross, 1992). Ogema’s actions reflect an understanding of both the physical environment and the prevailing social context. He knew the BIA would use any excuse as a reason to round up children to meet boarding school quotas (Guthrie, 2001). His intervention was also carefully crafted to minimize the anger and retaliation by the farmer – he approached the youth as soon as he heard about the mischief and made sure they repaired the fence before the police were called. Building peaceful relations with the surrounding Euro-American residents also built a buffer zone around the community as well as a collection of allies who sided with the Ojibwe in their dealings with the state or federal government.

As in any society, transgressions, disputes, and failures in caregiving emerged among Ojibwe people. The goals and methods for resolving differences, however, flow from this constellation of principles.

The goals of addressing conflict were ultimately to restore harmony, to help an “offender” re-establish pimadaziwin, to restore healthy relationships with those he or she has harmed, and to reintegrate the offender into the community. Survival necessitated healing disputes and assuring that all members contributed in positive ways to the group as a whole (Ross, 1992).

(Edited excerpts drawn from a number of essays I have written in the past.)

***

In these challenging times, it was helpful for me to revisit these ethical roots and once again reflect on pimadaziwin. It helped me remember that effective resistance requires deep and sturdy rootedness guided by thoughtful reflection and prudence.

Of course, I’m merely human. In times of conflict, I try to remember these ethics as I choose paths of resistance. Supportive networks like those of trees in the Menominee forest, with healthy root systems intertwined, add to our collective ability to stand strong. By making sure our community is healthy beneath the surface of things, we are better able to meet challenges in resilient, creative, constructive ways. Remembering our roots, nurturing each other, reflecting on the merits of different courses of action, and acting when the time is right seem to me to be the wisest long range strategies for survival.

The goal that inspires me to act is the possibility of building bridges of understanding and healing rather than reifing walls of conflict and division. This path, demonstrated by Ogema’s example, has enabled the Ojibwe people and many other oppressed groups to survive despite the power of destructive storms.

“Manido Gizhigans,” “Spirit Little Cedar Tree.” - Grand Portage, MN Credit: CBS

“Manido Gizhigans,” “Spirit Little Cedar Tree.” – Grand Portage, MN
Credit: CBS

 

References:

Adams, D. W. (1995). Education for extinction: American Indians and the boarding school experience, 1875-1928. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas Press.

Broker, I. (1983). Night Flying Woman: An Ojibway narrative. St. Paul, MN: Minnesoata Historic Society Press.

Child, B. J. (2000) Boarding school seasons: American Indian families, 1900-1940. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

Densmore, F. (1979). Chippewa customs. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press. (original work published in 1929)

Guthrie, M. (2001). Chronology of Lac du Flambeau Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school. Lac du Flambeau, WI: Lac du Flambeau Tribal Preservation Office.

Hallowell, A. I. (1967). Culture and experience. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press. (original work published in 1955)

Hilger, Sr. I. (1992) Chippewa childlife and its cultural background. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press. (original work published in 1951).

Johnston, B. (1976). Ojibway heritage. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

Johnston, B. (1982). Ojibwe ceremonies. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

Kohl, J. G. (1985). Kichi-Gami: Life among the Lake Superior Ojibwe. (L. Wraxall, Trans.) St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press. (original work published in 1860)

Prucha, F. P. (1971). The churches and the Indian schools, 1888-1912. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

Ross, R. (1992). Dancing with a ghost: Exploring Indian reality. Markham, ON, Canada: Octopus Publishing Group.

Szasz, M. C. (1999). Education and the American Indian: The road to self-determination since 1928, 3rd edition (revised and enlarged). Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press.

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About Carol A. Hand

What matters are not the titles I’ve held or university degrees I earned or the size of a house or bank account. It’s really what I’ve learned from ordinary people like me whom I’ve met along the way. They taught me to live with gratitude and give thanks for each new day.
This entry was posted in Reflections and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to Reflections about Roots and Resistance

  1. “Knowing our roots becomes crucial for many reasons. Although unseen, roots provide nourishment and grounding. Making sure our roots are healthy helps us withstand storms.”
    ~ So important for our survival in the face of adversity.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Interesting and insightful! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Joan says:

    Simultaneously grounding and uplifting…thank you, Carol.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. smilecalm says:

    it’s humbling drinking from your
    ancient, tried and true
    wisdom of being in harmony
    with each other and the nature
    from which we come, Carol 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Carol, I find it challenging to find words which honor your powerful writings, the depth of the stories and the inspiration I feel when I experience them. As I seek inspiration and comfort in these dark days, I bow to you in gratitude for your many gifts. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  6. underswansea says:

    Very fine post.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. desilef says:

    It was so interesting that, having just read Miriam’s post, I had dinner last night with a group of Colombians who were talking about how the Menominee fight for recognition and sovereignty has been an inspiration and model for indigenous people in Colombia, particularly the U’wa. Ideas and resistance will always cross borders no matter how many walls go up to divide us. (A nice thought, but we still need to stop the wall!)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for such thoughtful comments, Diane. I’m delighted to hear that the inspiration to resist oppression spreads. Your final comments about walls made me wonder if the threat of walls has a paradoxical effect – actually waking some people up and pissing them off enough to risk discomfort and reach across divisions. As always, I appreciate your thoughtful comments and ability to reach across differences in so many creative, compassionate ways. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Regardless of who we are, we all should know our roots as we stand on the shoulders of those who came before us. 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Sha'Tara says:

    I can feel your use of the symbols of roots, and the concept of non-violent but constant resistance to the forces of destruction. There is much power in your words; your article. Thank you, human!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Oh, Carol, this touched some deep chord in my. Tears of recognition and gratitude.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for your thoughtful comments, Michael. I thought of you as I wrote this. You have mentioned your struggle with how to identify your roots because of other’s reactions. It occurred to me that how others see us is really so unimportant. We need to learn to trust our own inner sense of who we are. It’s neither biologically determined nor culturally assigned. It’s a deeper internal knowing. I send my best wishes. ❤

      Like

  11. Annika Perry says:

    A learned and fascinating article,Carol.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Leya says:

    Powerful words, yet they should be in every human being who is humble, wise and thinking. Thank you for giving us words and hope.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. We are all culturally conditioned to conform to the corporate values we’re bombarded with in school and the media. The goal of the conditioning is to intimidate us and make us afraid to rebel.
    Our first task is to overcome this conditioning – and America’s First Nations have set us a very fine example of how to go about this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Being marginalized has it’s benefits, Dr. B. Indigenous peoples have had to become resilient in order to survive. People in many Native communities adopted a superficial veneer of conformity, but core values and survival skills were kept alive out of sight. It’s also interesting to study the unanticipated consequences of colonial policies like boarding schools and urban relocation. Intended to destroy cultures, and they did succeed in some cases and on some levels, these policies also led to the development of pan-Indian movements, cultural revivals, and more effective inter-tribal resistance. The knowledge and skills, as well as spiritually-grounded communal values, could certainly be an important foundation for future alternatives to what we have now.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Jeff Nguyen says:

    I listened to an interview the other day where they discussed the shifts in power taking place among some Oklahoma tribes. Because of the added jobs and income from casino gaming the tribes are gaining more of a political presence and improving in other areas. Among other things, they’ve used this influence to assert treaty rights for water in OK that Texas would like to slurp up.

    You’re pen is sharper than ever, Carol. I especially like the way you craft your stories by weaving narrative and sociological elements. Peace to you, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s a delight to hear from you, Jeff,. I’ve missed your presence and comments that are always thought-provoking.

      Casinos are a mixed blessing. Public opinion presents one set of challenges, and tribal decisions, another. I know from my work with tribes, only some casinos, those near urban areas, actually make a profit. Those in rural areas, however, tend to be one of the largest employers of both tribal and non-Native residents in the region. States like Wisconsin view casions as an excuse to reduce state funding for tribes. On the tribal side of things, some hold to communal values and invest in people and land. Others split the profits among individuals with less than admirable short-and long-term consequences. And a word of historical caution. When the Cherokees were forced to walk the trail of tears by Andrew Jackson (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h1567.html), they had a literacy rate of 99% and were more successful than white farmers. It made them objects of envy. I recently read that our current president just hung a picture of Jackson in his office. Water already is the next battle for tribes.

      Thank you for your comments and kind words, dear friend. ❤

      Like

      • Jeff Nguyen says:

        Good points about the downsides of casinos, I thought about that too when I listened to the interview. Sometimes it’s like making the proverbial deal with the devil. It’s a good question to consider just how much the tribes want to assimilate and whether they even should. Hopefully, different tribes will continue to diversify their resources and investments so they can have autonomy over their local decision making and values.

        Hope you have a good week, Carol.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Honoring tribal sovereignty is important, so I try to respect tribal decisions that I don’t necessarily agree with, especially if it’s something the community has supported. Centuries of abject poverty and oppression leave scars that aren’t easily or quickly healed.

          I hope your week goes well, too, Jeff. ❤

          Like

  15. This is so beautiful I don’t possess the language skills to properly express just how amazing it is.

    Liked by 1 person

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